Bentonite Clay Poultice for Rashes, Burns & Bug Bites

Bentonite clay sounds incredibly obscure, but it’s a word that should be in the vocabulary of every person interested in using natural remedies. It is a wonderfully versatile clay, used in cosmetics, taken internally, and included in many dermatological products. It comes from volcanic ash that has fallen into ancient bodies of water, which when evaporated; leave behind mineral rich beds of bentonite clay. These beds can contain up to 50 trace minerals, including magnesium, potassium, and calcium. Bentonite is perhaps best known for removing toxins, but externally provides a plethora of benefits. Made into a poultice it can soothe burns, relieve itching caused by bug bites, and protect from poison ivy and poison oak (as well as relieve the rash caused by it.) The reason it is particularly useful with the poison ivy family is because it provides a shield against urishol, the irritating oil found in those plants that causes a reaction.

Bentonite Clay Poultice- for rashes, burns & bug bites.

You will need…

-Bentonite clay
-1/4 cup warm water
- ¼ cup warmed olive or grapeseed oil

poultice ingredients

Directions

Mix together ¼ cup of warm olive oil and a ¼ cup warm water (yes, it will separate.)

adding the water
adding the olive oil
oil and water

Add enough bentonite clay until you get a nice thick paste that will stay in place well.

almost done
poultice paste

Cover the irritated area generously with the mixture, and then wrap a piece of clean gauze or light, thin, cotton around it to keep it covered. Let it dry for 3-4 hours and then rinse off with warm water, reapplying if needed. Its normal for your skin to feel a little tight as it dries.

applying the poultice
with gauze

Keeping a little jar of dry bentonite clay on hand is a good idea, after an unfortunate brush up with poison ivy, getting attacked by a swarm of mosquitos, or a winding up with a minor burn, just mix with your warm water, cover, and wait for relief.


You may also like our recipe for Homemade “Soothing Roots” Headache Balm.

Make sure you subscribe to the Everyday Roots newsletter to get helpful tips on home remedies, gardening and natural living sent straight to your email.

×

P.S. Take a look at the Everyday Roots Book. It's a Book that we created to help you replace the toxic products and medications in your home with healthier, all-natural alternatives. It contains 215+ effective home remedies and covers everything you will need to protect your family and save money every month.

Get natural remedies delivered weekly by entering your email below...


By Claire Goodall

Claire is a lover of life, the natural world, and wild blueberries. On the weekend you can find her fiddling in the garden, playing with her dogs, and enjoying the great outdoors with her horse. Claire is very open-minded, ask her anything :) Meet Claire→

         

We Want to Hear from You! Let us know which remedies work and do not work for you, ask a question or leave a comment:

5 Comments

  1. Merci says:

    Re your article on Bentonite clay
    Where can I get it
    In the San Francisco Bay Area?

    • Claire (Everyday Roots) says:

      Hi Merci,

      I am not terribly familiar with what shops might stock it there, but we order ours online from Mountain Rose Herbs-it saves you a trip to the store too :)

  2. Betti says:

    Fantastic. I have a huge box of this stuff for my fish pond. Good to know I can use it on me too.

  3. Leah says:

    Great article. I have a couple of questions: I’ve been using more clay recently (earthpaste, clay mixed with water and drinking it, an occasional capsule or two filled with Redmond clay, and I also mixed it in with my homemade deodorant). I noticed since I added clay to the deodorant I’ve gotten an itchy rash under my arms. Also, sometimes when I drink the clay with water, especially first thing in the morning, I get a bad headache. Do you think the rash and the headache could be a detox reaction from the clay? Is there any documentation that this could happen?

  4. marion belcastro says:

    need something natural for boils

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

You may use these HTML tags and attributes: <a href="" title=""> <abbr title=""> <acronym title=""> <b> <blockquote cite=""> <cite> <code> <del datetime=""> <em> <i> <q cite=""> <strike> <strong>

MEDICAL AND GENERAL DISCLAIMER FOR EVERYDAYROOTS.COM (Referred to as Everyday Roots.)

Everyday Roots is intended for informational purposes only. Our site contains general information about medical conditions and treatments, and provides information and ideas for, but not limited to, natural and home remedies. Everyday Roots makes no claims that anything presented is true, accurate, proven, and/or not harmful to your health or wellbeing. Our website is not and does not claim to be written, edited, or researched by a health care professional. Any information on or associated with this website should NOT be considered a substitute for medical advice from a healthcare professional. If you are experiencing any form of health problem, always consult a doctor before attempting any treatment on your own. Everyday Roots will not be held liable or responsible in any way for any harm, injury, illness, or death that may result from the use of its content or anything related to it. Viewers assume all risk and liability associated with the use of the content on our site, and must agree to our terms and conditions.

DISCLAIMER ON COMMENTS & ADVICE GIVEN

Please note that the below information is designed to provide general information on the topics presented. It is provided with the understanding that the expert is not engaged in rendering any medical or professional services in the information provided below. The information provided should not be used as a substitute for professional services.