Homemade Cinnamon Mouthwash for Bad Breath

Bad breath (officially known as halitosis, if it’s chronic) is a problem that can be caused by anything from an over-load of bacteria in your mouth, underlying dental problems, or just a stinky snack with foods like garlic or onions. But that mouthwash that you buy at the store…why is it electric green or bright purple anyways? If you  take a moment to read the label, you’ll find you’re not getting much more than a mouthful of chemicals, artificial coloring, and flavoring that does little to help your breath for more than a half hour or so. It may actually do more damage long-term-one of the most popular ingredients in mouthwash is ethyl alcohol, which can weaken the lining of your gums. Although inconclusive, Stanford University has conducted research that may link certain mouthwash to oral cancer. So the next time you need to freshen your breath, try making this DIY mouth rinse. It’s inexpensive, refreshing, and effective-not to mention that you know what’s in it, and can take comfort in the fact that its not the color of toxic sludge.

Homemade Cinnamon & Honey Mouthwash for Bad Breath

Ingredients: Cinnamon powder, honey, lemon juice, baking soda (optional).

Why cinnamon: Unlike mint, which tends to just mask the smell of bad breath, cinnamon actually gets rid of the odor by killing off odor-causing bacteria. The International Association for Dental Research found that people who chewed cinnamon gum had a 50% decrease in oral bacteria versus people who chewed mint.

cinnamon

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Why honey: Honey makes everything taste better, but it also has antibacterial properties. If possible, get Manuka honey. Manuka honey is from New Zealand, and contains 127 times the amount of methylglyoxa, which is the antimicrobial agent that kills off bacteria, than acacia honey (the regular sweet stuff you usually see.) Always try to get organic raw honey.


Why lemon juice: Lemon has a strong refreshing citrus scent that can help with nasty cases of bad breath.

lemons help bad breath

Why baking soda: Baking soda wipes out nasty things (like bad bacteria) and has been shown to help whiten teeth.

You will need…

-2 lemons
-1/2 tablespoon of cinnamon
-1/2 teaspoon-1 teaspoon baking soda
-1 ½ teaspoons of honey
-1 cup of warm water
-A bottle or jar with a tight fitting lid

mouthwash ingredients
put it together

Directions

Put ½ tablespoon of cinnamon into a bottle or jar with a tight fitting lid, and add the juice of 2 freshly squeezed lemons along with 1 ½ teaspoons of honey. If you’d like you can also add in 1/2-1 teaspoon of baking soda and omit the honey, or use both. Pour 1 cup of very warm water (needed to melt the honey) into the jar, and stir well. When you need to freshen up your breath, give it a quick shake and swish/gargle 1-2 tablespoons for 1 minute.

cinnamon mouth wash

We Want to Know: What natural remedies do you use for bad breath?

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By Claire Goodall

Claire is a lover of life, the natural world, and wild blueberries. On the weekend you can find her fiddling in the garden, playing with her dogs, and enjoying the great outdoors with her horse. Claire is very open-minded, ask her anything :) Meet Claire→

      

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25 Comments

  1. Rachael says:

    Will this be ok out of the fridge, if so for how long?

  2. christi says:

    Thank you for this! I am allergic to mint and get so frustrated at all the “mint” recipes for dental hygiene! !

  3. James says:

    Is there anything else I coukd use other than cinnamon? I have never liked cinnamon, plus it always seems to burn my mouth when I do have some, even when i sprinkle a littke on my egg nog around Christmas time!

  4. Max says:

    James, use Nutmeg on your Egg Nog.

  5. Robbin says:

    I just made this. I found it easier to put the ingredients in a bowl and whisk them together. My bottle was a little too small for the entire amount and the cinnamon settled to the bottom. My batch was not as clear as the one in the picture. The taste is very lemony and it leaves a cinnamony taste in your mouth. Pretty good! :D

    • Lamiyah says:

      I just tried this as well. And mine trun the same as yours. The cinnamon is more consecrated at the bottom with lemony taste !! Feels refreshing :)

  6. marcia says:

    I know that lemons are acidic and wonder if it is really necessary to add the lemon juice. I have weak enamel and do not want to make it worse. Thank you for sharing your incite and amazing recipes.

    • Lou says:

      Marcia,

      Honey often has botulism spores in and I’m somewhat sure you will need an acid to stop it thriving.

      I’ve made this and it works great. But I made my own variation, cause I wanted to use less acid. What I do it just make is fresh daily, and it needs less acid, or none if very fresh. I’ve been known to just use honey and cinnamon. I just leave the cinnamon to infuse for as long as possible, then add honey to taste when ready.

      This recipe above and my variation has help my mouth infection that kept spreading from persistent ear infection. I treated the ear infection by putting garlic, oil and vinegar in a pestle and mortar, and then sieving the juice through. That help the ears, the above mouthwash help with the throat.

  7. sharon says:

    Can this mouthwash be swallowed to cleanse the body as well?

  8. Olivia says:

    I’ve tried a lot of your remedy’sthere very good

  9. Maha says:

    wouldnt the citrus rot the teeth?

  10. anna maranan says:

    is there any expiration on homemade cinnamon and honey mouthwash, can i put it inside the fridge for longer life?

  11. Olivia Lane says:

    this looks interesting. i don’t use mouthwash but my bf uses listerine, which drives me crazy. i’ve been exploring natural recipes to try to convert him so thanks! it’s my first time at your site (i think). I’m having fun! :-)
    I share green cleaning and other fun stuff on my blog. hope you’ll visit.

  12. diana says:

    How can I use the baking soda without causing all to erupt like a volcano experiment?!

    • Lamiyah says:

      I mixed the lemon juice with cinnamon and parking soda mixed them up. Then I added the hot water it turned out fine !! (:

  13. jacqueline says:

    Only one cup of water make the bottle shown in picture?

  14. ijeoma says:

    In fact am just taking a cup of cinnamon and honey as a step down tonight :) taste real good! Thanks

  15. really says:

    When I put cinnamon, then lemon juice and added baking soda…guess what happend? It started reacting and creating a foam and my mouthwash left the jar…

  16. Kevin says:

    It may actually do more damage long-term-one of the most popular ingredients in mouthwash is ethyl alcohol, which can weaken the lining of your gums.

  17. Breath smells like rotten eggs says:

    I like this concept, home made, where we know what to do everything from the kitchen of our own home. Homemade Cinnamon Mouthwash is a good technique to fight bad breath. Thanks!

  18. nancy bodfield says:

    The recipe for the mouthwash, how long will it keep and do you have to keep in fridge?
    Thanks

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